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>> RFID Knowledge >> What is NFC


What is NFC?


If you've looked at the hardware specifications for a top of the line handset at any point in the last few years, there's a good chance that you've seen NFC listed on the spec sheet. But despite the age of NFC, it hasn't yet become the norm for all smartphones. If you're content with an older handset, or can't quite justify springing for the latest top of the line model, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about. So here's a rundown of what NFC is, how it works, and what it can be used for.
NFC stands for "Near Field Communication" and, as the name implies, it enables short range communication between compatible devices. This requires at least one transmitting device, and another to receive the signal. A range of devices can use the NFC standard and can be considered either passive or active, depending on how the device works.
Passive NFC devices include tags, and other small transmitters, that can send information to other NFC devices without the need for a power source of their own. However, they don't really process any information sent from other sources, and can't connect to other passive components. These often take the form of interactive signs on walls or advertisements.
Active devices are able to both send and receive data, and can communicate with each other as well as with passive devices. Smartphones are by far the most common implementation of active NFC devices, but public transport card readers and touch payment terminals are also good examples of the technology.

Post by Oprfid.com Jan,13th,2016
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* Any question or inquiry about NFC tags and RFID related products, please send email to info@oprfid.com, we will reply you within 24 hours, thanks
 
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        NFC, or near-field communication, is an easy and intuitive technology that allows you to use your mobile phone for special purposes. An NFC tag can share and link to information such as web pages, social media and all other sorts of other information generally. Other areas where NFC is starting to evolve into are making payments, opening doors secured with contactless locks, logging on to computers and many more. All of these actions have something in common, that is they invoke an action based on you placing your phone (or any other NFC device) near (the N in NFC) the thing you want to read or interact with.